My MS Story

I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in March of 2012.  Looking back now, I realize that I started feeling symptoms in May of the previous year.  I had recently started running after a few months off due to injury.  After some long runs, I would experience a tingling sensation throughout my lower legs.  I described it as feeling like something was tickling my legs from the inside and just figured it was my muscles firing away from the exertion of the run.

Fast forward to fall of 2011, I had been doing Bikram hot yoga for a while and loved the sweaty-ness of the classes and how drained, but great I would feel afterward.  Out of the blue one day in class I went into a certain pose that is done every class with my head tucked down and my back hunched over (sounds like a lovely move, doesn’t it?) and had a shooting pain go from my right rib cage down to my foot.  It felt like an electrical shock.  I stood up out of the pose and was fine, so I just thought I had tweaked something, no big deal.  A few days later I had forgotten about this incident and went back to class.  Back in the same pose and again, I had this electrical shock feeling down my body.  Strange, I thought, but as soon as I would come out of the pose it would go away.  This went on for the next month of going to classes, but since nothing ever bothered other than in this and one other pose, I simply ignored it

A week before Thanksgiving I began to feel some strange tingling and slight numbness in my toes.  It slowly but gradually kept moving up my legs.  I was training for an upcoming race and reluctantly took a few days off from running.  That didn’t help, so, of course, I started running again.  The pain did not get worse when I ran, so I figured why not.

A trip to the ER and then a neurologist and I was told to go start getting MRIs and head down the path of tests.  At the time I was reluctant to do so because we do not have great insurance and I knew it was going to cost many thousands of dollars and I felt like I would be poked and prodded and still not have an answer.  So I tried to move on and forget all about it.  I even ran the Phoenix Rock n Roll Marathon in January.  I thought eventually these weird sensations would go away and I’d just chalk it up to some unexplained thing.  Well, that worked for a short period of time, but the tingling sensations remained.

In February 2012 I got very sick and was eventually told I had pneumonia.  The tingling was still around and something inside of me said it’s time to try to figure this out.  Finally this “thing” had my attention.  3 MRIs, various neurological exams, blood work, and a spinal tap later (yes the spinal tap is really as awful as everyone says it is, I would never wish the horrific headaches on anyone) and I received the MS diagnosis.

This is still quite new to me, so I decided to start my blog to document my journey and reach out to others that may be going through similar trials in life, whether it be with MS or something else.  I pray that God will use me for His purpose and glory because “in all things God works for the good of those who love Him, who have been called according to His purpose.”  Romans 8:28

For information on MS, please go to the National MS Society.

15 thoughts on “My MS Story

  1. Beth,
    My hat is off to you. I only wish you the best and look forward to reading your blogs. You are an inspiration to more people than you know. Thank-you for taking time out of your busy schedule to continue on with this blog.

  2. I am going to keep you in my prayers. He will never leave you. I’m glad we have him to talk to, cry to, learn from and to look to. You are an inspiration to so many. :)

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  4. I was diagnosed with MS at the age of 24, at a time I was graduating college and ready to start a new chapter of my life. I was devastated, but I refused to let it define me. I continued to live my life as normal, and a few years ago I picked up running (in December, I will be doing my 4th marathon in two years).I wanted to make sure I was doing everything I can in my power to keep my body healthy. Thank you for showing the blog world that a disease doesn’t define you!

    • Kimberly, thanks for commenting and sharing your story. I LOVE to hear about other MS warriors who are persevering. 4 marathons in 2 years is awesome, wishing you a great race in December, let me know how it goes. Take care!

  5. I am so glad I found your site. I am a fellow MSer and runner. I started running years after my diagnosis. My symptoms started when I was 15 years old. They came and went. I was diagnosed in 2002. Many years of feeling sorry for myself and weight gain I decided to make a change. I lost 165 pounds and became a runner. I have run many short races. Last October I ran my first half, 1:46:47. I hope to do another and then a full. Thank you for the inspiration. Keep on rocking!

    • Hi Brian. Thanks for reading and posting a comment. Congratulations on your first half marathon. And, wow, a 165 pound weight loss?! That is very impressive. Way to take control of your health. That is inspirational to me!

  6. Just wanted to thank you for sharing your story and staying active. I was diagnosed last April when my whole left side went completely numb(among other things) and thought the worst. I have been running for 3.5 years now and thought that it was another part of me I was going to have to mourn. Since then Ive mostly recovered and started running again. I have a half marathon in September, 2 more 5ks and plenty of races to sign up for. I was thinking I’d never get to do a full marathon, but after reading yours and a few other stories Im thinking I may be able to after all. I was planning on doing the Rock and Roll Marathon in Seattle next year before I was DX., and you have helped me to realize that maybe I still can. Thanks again for your story and best of luck to you and yours.

  7. I stumbled upon your blog today. Hallelujah! It gives me hope to see how great you’re doing and continuing with enduring exercise. I’m a marathoner. I’ve done 13 marathons (3 this year) and 24 half marathons since 2005. But I was diagnosed with MS in October. It’s been overwhelming and I feel as if my fitness and plans for future running plans are slipping away. I needed to read something like this because running and exercise has become a huge part of who I am. Thank you for sharing. :)

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  9. Beth,
    My cousin is a friend of yours and in April she and I had dinner together. She was with me in 2004 at the emergency room in Albuquerque when I was first diagnosed with MS. She told me about you and your blog and I’m so embarrassed that it has taken me so long to get on and read it. You are amazing, an inspiration and I admire the faith you have to face this disease, as I also give my gratitude to God for the strength I’ve needed, especially in the past two years, in dealing with the worst relapse since my diagnosis. I’m happy to say that today I am not relying on a wheel chair, walker, or cane to get from point A to point B. Although I look a little tipsy when I’m walking, I’m upright and that’s something to celebrate! Thank you for sharing your story.
    Jenn

  10. I was just diagnosed with MS. My neurologist told me that she would support me on this adventure. I am set to participate in Ironman Wisconsin in September. I had just told another triathlete that I wasn’t sure how this was going to work. Everyone that I have encountered has done marathons, or 70.3. No-one has done an Ironman. You give me hope that I can find away to train and get through Ironman Wisconsin! Thanks for your story!

    • Thank you so much for commenting on my blog and reaching out. I’m sorry to hear about your diagnosis, but I’m super glad you found my blog. What you said is exactly why I started my blog after my diagnosis. I simply couldn’t find anyone or any information regarding people with MS doing endurance sports. This July I’ll be taking on my 4th Ironman, so I’m here to tell you that you can absolutely do it!

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